Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Filter
Filter
  1. A1
  2. A2

Level A1

Level A1 Description

The Level A1 curriculum supports students as they develop basic knowledge, understanding and skills in English. Through immersion in English, students build their capacity to participate in routine and familiar exchanges in English with their peers. As a result, they begin to recognise the ways that pronunciation, stress and intonation impact clarity of expression. Through reciprocal exchanges...

Show more

Level A1 Content Descriptions

Speaking and Listening

Communication Elaborations
  1. Demonstrate attentive listening behaviour (VCEALC001)
    1. employing strategies such as watching and listening to what peers are doing, following the speaker, watching the teacher’s face
    2. using some body language, such as nodding or facial expressions, to respond to the speaker
  2. Respond simply to questions and prompts (VCEALC002)
    1. recognising familiar question stem words such as ‘Who’, ‘Where’, ‘Do’
    2. understanding common or personal questions, for example ‘How old are you?’, ‘What sports do you like?’
    3. giving simple responses, such as nodding, ‘yes’, ‘no’, short learnt phrases
    4. responding to questions with a single word or phrase but making longer utterances by substituting words in known sentence patterns
    5. expanding on basic personal information when prompted, supported and given adequate time, such as ‘My name is ...’, ‘I come from …’
    6. borrowing and adapting key words from questions, for example by reordering, as in Teacher: ‘Are you finished, Ali?’ Student: ‘Ali finished’
  3. Negotiate simple social or learning activities (VCEALC003)
    1. observing peers and copying actions in response to instructions or in classroom activities
    2. asking for attention or assistance from the teacher or a friend by asking directly, using intonation to signal requests or indicating non-understanding through speech or body language
    3. understanding common vocabulary related to needs (such as ‘toilet’, ‘pencil’, ‘stop’) and constructing simple phrases with this vocabulary (such as ‘Go toilet?’, ‘This my pencil’, ‘Stop that!’)
    4. using picture cards, classroom charts and objects to support communication, for example pointing to a picture
  4. Question to check meaning so as to clarify or confirm (VCEALC004)
    1. checking understanding of simple, familiar instructions and routines, for example Teacher: ‘It’s playtime.’ Student: ‘Go outside?’
    2. using learnt social formulas, such as ‘please’ and ‘thank you’, when asking questions
    3. using simple formulaic expressions to make requests or ask questions, for example ‘Please say again’, ‘What is that?’
    4. listening to and using speaker’s key words when asking for clarification, for example Teacher: ‘Paste it in your book.’ Student: ‘Language book?’
    5. supplementing spoken requests with gesture and mime
  5. Understand a simple spoken text (VCEALC005)
    1. listening to a long text with visual support, such as instructions for and a demonstration of a game or art activity
    2. recognising familiar vocabulary, for example animal names, colours, time markers
    3. identifying single items of information from short spoken texts, such as a number, colour, name
    4. answering specific questions about the spoken text that are based on familiar question stems such as ‘Who’, ‘Where’, ‘When’
  6. Follow simple instructions in familiar school routines by relying on key words and non-verbal communication and context (VCEALC006)
    1. identifying key words and phrases that refer to familiar objects in the classroom
    2. recognising familiar action verbs in instructions, such as ‘Line up’, ‘Stand up’, ‘Sit down’
    3. relying on contextual information, for example the teacher’s gestures, the actions of peers
  7. Participate in simple and familiar songs, rhymes and chants (VCEALC007)
    1. reciting familiar rhymes, songs with actions or lists of words such as days of the week or colours of the rainbow
    2. rehearsing formulas or short exchanges based on models, such as ‘Hello, what is your name?’, ‘My name is … What is your name?’, ‘Pleased to meet you’
    3. role-playing popular stories or songs, for example ‘Little pig, little pig, let me in’
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Understand when a response is required and attempt to respond using either known words or non-verbal language (VCEALA008)
    1. responding appropriately to comments with simple non-verbal language, or indicating non-comprehension, such as by smiling when greeted, shaking or nodding head in response to questions
    2. indicating agreement or non-agreement through body language or simple utterances such as ‘yes’ or ‘no’
    3. giving simple, short responses to familiar questions, for example ‘My name is …’
  2. Use non-verbal language to sustain interaction with others (VCEALA009)
    1. demonstrating attention through non-verbal behaviours such as body orientation, eye contact, nodding, smiling, laughing, gesturing
    2. interacting appropriately by copying the actions of peers
    3. recognising that some particular words, gestures and intonations may be appropriate or inappropriate in certain contexts
  3. Use acceptable social formulas and gestures to interact appropriately in context (VCEALA010)
    1. listening to and observing others to understand the nature of familiar social interactions
    2. demonstrating a range of appropriate gestures including nodding, shaking head, raising hand
    3. recalling and using common social formulas, such as ‘thank you’, ‘excuse me’, ‘please’
  4. Use simple strategies to respond to conversation breakdown (VCEALA011)
    1. attempting to repeat, re-pronounce or self-correct key words when prompted by the listener
    2. using simple formulaic expressions to ask for clarification, for example ‘Please say again’, ‘What is that?’
    3. listening to and using speaker’s key words when asking for clarification, for example ‘What “sibling”?’
    4. using appropriate social conventions such as ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ when making requests
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Distinguish English from other languages (VCEALA012)
    1. recognising the sounds and words of English when being spoken to
    2. assessing which language(s) the speaker knows, and responding using shared repertoire
  2. Use some features of home language (VCEALA013)
    1. using phonological features from home language, for example pronouncing new English words using similar sounds from home language
    2. responding in home language and/or English when asked a question
    3. making connections between new English words and home language words containing similar sounds
  3. Check understanding of classroom conversations or instructions by asking other home language speakers to clarify (VCEALA014)
    1. asking questions about classroom activities and topics in home language
    2. seeking instructions from same language peers before beginning classroom tasks
    3. understanding responses from peers that combine elements of English, home language and gesture
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Recognise familiar spoken texts (VCEALL015)
    1. recognising common functions of speech, such as questions, statements, commands
    2. recognising a small number of familiar texts used frequently in class, such as songs, rhymes, stories
    3. listening to and reproducing the sequence of ideas in a short spoken story or recount
    4. recognising familiar words in spoken texts
  2. Engage in simple, short dialogues and initiate short utterances using a range of formulas appropriate for different purposes and functions (VCEALL016)
    1. responding to simple, direct questions about personal or familiar topics
    2. using social formulas such as ‘please’, ‘thank you’, ‘excuse me’
    3. using learnt phrases in different situations, such as ‘What’s the time?’, ‘Oh, no!’, ‘Very good!’
    4. expressing opinions about an experience or text in simple ways, for example ‘I like’, ‘not good’
Grammatical patterns
  1. Recognise simple questions and instructions through intonation and context (VCEALL017)
    1. recognising that a question has been asked, based on intonation
    2. recognising and following instructions based on the actions of peers
  2. Communicate using short, learnt phrases (VCEALL018)
    1. using single-word or phrasal responses to questions, such as ‘Yes’, ‘No’, ‘I don’t know’
    2. using learnt phrases in play, such as ‘Give me’, ‘Stop it’, ‘I don’t like’
    3. creating original utterances by substituting new words in learnt patterns or formulas, such as ‘It’s home time’, ‘It’s go time’
    4. using simplified speech patterns, where function words may be omitted or used incorrectly, for example ‘Me go to shopping and buyed many thing’
  3. Construct simple subject–verb–object sentences that mostly use present tense (VCEALL019)
    1. constructing basic sentences using subject–verb–object word order, but with non-standard word forms, for example ‘We buy house’
    2. constructing short, simple statements showing subject–verb relations with varying accuracy, such as ‘He sick’, ‘Students go’
  4. Use a small range of grammatical patterns (VCEALL020)
    1. expressing simple statements, questions and commands using common words in order, supported by intonation, for example ‘She go’, ‘My book?’, ‘Give me’
    2. generalising some grammatical patterns to new contexts, though with some inaccuracies, such as ‘to the farm’, ‘to the Australia’
    3. using patterns to create new forms of words, though with some overgeneralisation, such as ‘played’, ‘eated’, ‘goed’
  5. Understand the tense of statements or instructions by using time references (VCEALL021)
    1. understanding common time references in basic sentences, such as ‘We went yesterday’, ‘Tomorrow we will go’, ‘Now we can eat lunch’
    2. matching simple verb tense to time words, such as ‘Yesterday we did …’, ‘Tomorrow we do …’
    3. sometimes using inconsistent tense when describing events in the past, present and future, for example ‘We waited and then catch the train’
  6. Express simple negation with varying accuracy (VCEALL022)
    1. expressing negation using ‘no’ or ‘not’ with some errors, for example ‘I no like vegetable’, ‘I not go’
    2. using ‘no’ or ‘not’ with adjectives or nouns to express negative forms, such as ‘No hot today’, ‘Not me’
  7. Demonstrate variable placement of common adjectives to describe or add emphasis (VCEALL023)
    1. combining an adjective with a noun to create simple noun groups, with varying accuracy, such as ‘big truck’, ‘car blue’
    2. using a small range of common adverbs, such as ‘slowly’, ‘very’
    3. combining some common adverbs with verbs to describe action, with varying accuracy, for example ‘walk slowly’, ‘sing good’
    4. using common adverbs to vary intensity, for example ‘very hot’, ‘little bit funny’
  8. Understand gender in common personal and possessive pronouns (VCEALL024)
    1. pointing correctly to people or illustrations based on questions or instructions using gendered personal (‘him’, ‘her’) or possessive pronouns (‘his’, ‘her’), for example ‘Who is he?’, ‘Which is her bag?’
    2. using gendered pronouns with accuracy some of the time, for example ‘He is my dad’, ‘My aunty, he …’
Word knowledge
  1. Borrow key words from previous speaker (VCEALL025)
    1. borrowing key words from questions to compose answers, such as Student 1: ‘Do you want to play chasey?’, Student 2: ‘Yeah, play chasey’
  2. Recognise and use words from lexical sets related to immediate communicative need, interest or experience (VCEALL026)
    1. use common words related to immediate needs, such as colours, numbers, days, family- and school-specific word sets
    2. using a single word for a variety of purposes, for example using ‘book’ to mean ‘This is my book’, ‘Where is her book?’, ‘I’d like to borrow that book’
    3. referring to classroom charts and personal vocabulary lists to identify, clarify and rehearse words
    4. using a range of strategies to learn new words and phrases, such as private rehearsal, personal vocabulary lists, use in own speech and writing
Phonology
  1. Imitate pronunciation, stress and intonation patterns (VCEALL027)
    1. imitating and rehearsing pronunciation, stress and intonation patterns used by the teacher and peers, such as in stories, songs, rhymes
    2. developing accurate pronunciation, stress and intonation for a small range of familiar and commonly used words and phrases, including personal language, classroom language, social formulas
  2. Use intelligible pronunciation but with many pauses and hesitations (VCEALL028)
    1. imitating and rehearsing pronunciation for familiar and commonly used words
    2. accurately pronouncing a small range of familiar words, including personal language, classroom language, some basic topic vocabulary
    3. pronouncing familiar individual words clearly and pausing between words rather than using fluent phrasing
  3. Recognise ways intonation is used to enhance meaning or distinguish statements from questions (VCEALL029)
    1. recognising emotions expressed through intonation, such as happiness, anger
    2. distinguishing between questions, instructions and statements based on clear intonation and contextual information such as the actions of peers
    3. using rising intonation for questions and stressing key words for emphasis

Reading and Viewing

Communication Elaborations
  1. Read short, familiar texts (VCEALC030)
    1. reading familiar texts aloud, such as own writing, a familiar story, a text used in class, with prompts from the teacher
    2. tracking words with a finger while listening to a simple text read aloud
    3. reading short, previously learnt texts, such as simple rhymes, songs, repetitive texts
    4. reading classroom signs, labels, words from classroom charts
    5. reading some familiar words and short phrases in context, such as everyday signs and labels, familiar names, some letters, basic numbers, some common logos
  2. Understand aspects of simple, familiar texts (VCEALC031)
    1. recognising illustrations or character names when rereading a familiar story
    2. understanding repeated conventional features of familiar text types, such as titles, ‘Once upon a time’
    3. identifying characters, settings or key events in a narrative
    4. showing comprehension through appropriate activities, such as sequencing pictures, dramatising a story, painting or drawing characters
  3. Identify familiar words and simple sentences and match them to images (VCEALC032)
    1. using images to discern the storyline of a text and predict individual words in texts about familiar topics
    2. identifying the main character in an image
    3. pointing to images of familiar words, for example ‘apple’, ‘girl’, ‘house’
    4. matching a short description to an image, for example ‘a green fruit’
  4. Show a personal response to a text (VCEALC033)
    1. looking at or reading a book in own personal time
    2. pointing out a favourite image or page
    3. expressing a simple opinion on a text, for example indicating like or dislike of a character
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Understand the direction of English text (VCEALA034)
    1. holding a book with the correct orientation and locating the front and back of the book
    2. tracking with finger from left to right when reading or listening to a text being read aloud
    3. turning to the correct page at the appropriate time, based on tracking reading or imitating the actions of others
  2. Understand that texts are meaningful (VCEALA035)
    1. recognising that everyday texts are meaningful, for example asking the teacher to read a sign aloud
    2. showing awareness that print and visual texts are created to share a message
    3. understanding that print texts contain a consistent message, for example indicating when the ending of a well-known story varies
    4. understanding that different texts have different purposes, including picture books, class blogs, reports
    5. selecting from familiar texts to achieve a specific purpose, for example ‘Which chart tells us about time?’
    6. recalling the key message of sections of a familiar text that is revisited in class
  3. Identify purposes for reading, such as reading for enjoyment and reading for information (VCEALA036)
    1. distinguishing between fiction and non-fiction books
    2. matching a text to its purpose, for example a story book or an information poster
    3. identifying the intended audience of a text, for example ‘This story is for children’, ‘This book is for adults’
  4. Participate in shared reading activities (VCEALA037)
    1. focusing during group reading activities
    2. participating with key repetitive phrases or choruses in shared reading activities
    3. imitating the pronunciation of the teacher and peers in shared reading activities
    4. participating in activities to accompany texts, such as performing actions for a song, following instructions for a simple science activity
    5. contributing to shared responses to texts, such as sequencing images in order, matching sentence stems and endings, answering simple questions about ideas in a text
  5. Select books to look at or read independently (VCEALA038)
    1. exploring a new book before reading, by looking at the images, amount of print and familiar elements
    2. seeking books in home language or related to familiar topics to share with family members
    3. engaging with picture books selected by the teacher and some self-selected books
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Distinguish Roman script from non-Roman script (VCEALA039)
    1. recognising letters of the alphabet and words written in English
    2. pointing to words in English in a multilingual text
  2. Use simple dictionaries and word charts (VCEALA040)
    1. referring to picture dictionaries or bilingual dictionaries in the classroom to check meaning or spelling
    2. using words from classroom vocabulary charts when speaking or writing
    3. keeping copies of vocabulary charts that include images, English and home language
  3. Recall or repeat familiar or favourite parts of a text using memory or home language resources (VCEALA041)
    1. identifying familiar settings, characters or events in stories
    2. retelling events or describing characters from a story, or stating facts from an information text
    3. answering simple questions about personal experience related to stories, for example ‘Have you ever …?’, ‘Do you like … too?’
    4. translating parts of a familiar or favourite text to explain it to a family member or home language peer
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Recognise and explore different types of texts (VCEALL042)
    1. identifying and engaging with print and visual texts
    2. exploring a small range of simple text types such as recounts, narratives, information reports
    3. navigating different types of texts, for example turning the pages of a book, clicking links on a website, finding points of interest on a map
  2. Understand and explore the basic features of different texts (VCEALL043)
    1. matching labels to parts of a simple text, for example the title, introduction, requirements and method of a procedure; or the title, images and text on a poster
    2. answering simple questions about the features of a text, for example ‘What is the name of this text?’, ‘Where is there a list in this text?’
    3. making simple predictions about the topic or purpose of the text, for example based on the introduction to an instructional video
    4. following step-by-step instructions to find information in a text, for example ‘Open up the contents page. Now find the heading that says “ocean”. Which page should we turn to?’
  3. Understand and use simple metalanguage for books and reading (VCEALL044)
    1. understanding terminology such as ‘book’, ‘author’, ‘picture’, ‘word’
    2. identifying and naming elements of book layout and aspects of reading, such as word, letter, page, title, cover
    3. pointing to parts of a book in response to questions such as ‘What is the author’s name?’, ‘Find the start of the sentence’
Grammatical patterns
  1. Rely on content words to understand the main idea in a text (VCEALL045)
    1. recognising common or learnt words in class texts
    2. suggesting the topic of a text based on understanding content words in a title
  2. Recognise familiar words and phrases (VCEALL046)
    1. recognising and reading personally significant words, such as own name on charts, book labels and name tags
    2. locating and pointing to familiar words or phrases when prompted, for example ‘This book is about frogs. Where can you see the word “frog”?’
    3. reading aloud words and phrases from familiar texts
    4. recognising common words and phrases from familiar charts, labels, books
    5. recognising labels for frequently accessed classroom items, for example ‘books’, ‘recycling’
    6. following instructions on simple signs such as ‘Stop’, ‘Line up here’
Word knowledge
  1. Identify repetitive words or phrases in known texts (VCEALL047)
    1. pointing to or counting repeated words in a text, for example ‘How many times can you see the word “me”?’
    2. identifying characters or objects that are represented in both images and print text
  2. Recognise some familiar words in context (VCEALL048)
    1. recognising some familiar, personally significant words in context, such as own name on a list, peers’ names on labels, days of the week
    2. identifying some familiar vocabulary (mainly content words) in a supported context, such as shared reading or teacher-led discussion
Grapho-phonics
  1. Recognise some letters of the alphabet (VCEALL049)
    1. recognising and naming some letters of the alphabet
    2. identifying common letters in different words consistently, for example pointing to all the ‘t’s in a sentence
    3. reading aloud the spelling of a word by naming the letters
  2. Identify some sounds in words (VCEALL050)
    1. relating some letters of the alphabet to sounds, for example relating some vowels to their usual or common sounds
    2. using initial letters and common letter patterns to decode new words
    3. attempting to pronounce new words by using the most common sound for each letter and sounds for familiar letter groups, following instruction from the teacher such as ‘What does the first letter sound like?’
  3. Recognise some common letters and letter patterns in words (VCEALL051)
    1. identifying common letters or letter patterns in words in letter charts, familiar books or other texts
    2. locating particular letters, both lower-case and capital, in a short text when prompted
    3. locating words containing the same letter patterns in a short text, for example words containing ‘ch’ or all the words with double letters
  4. Recognise capital letters, spaces and full stops (VCEALL052)
    1. showing awareness that words are separated by spaces, such as by pointing to words or counting words
    2. pointing to capital letters and full stops in a text
    3. pausing at full stops when reading aloud
    4. using spaces to count words in a sentence or on a line
    5. using capital letters and full stops to count sentences
  5. Follow text with finger while reading (VCEALL053)
    1. tracking with finger and following as the teacher or a peer reads
    2. turning pages, following the teacher or peers
  6. Adopt the teacher’s intonation patterns when reading familiar texts (VCEALL054)
    1. listening to a teacher or peer read the text aloud, rehearsing and imitating pronunciation, intonation and emphasis
    2. chorusing reading with the teacher and peers

Writing

Communication Elaborations
  1. Copy well-known symbols, words, phrases or short texts (VCEALC055)
    1. tracing or copying letters, words and sentences written by the teacher
    2. copying out a short text jointly constructed by the class
    3. copying and completing short, formulaic sentences to describe familiar images, such as ‘This is a …’
    4. making corrections to own writing when copying text
  2. Write simple sentences related to own experience or school context (VCEALC056)
    1. writing familiar words and strings of letters that approximate the pronunciation of words
    2. completing sentences giving personal information, for example ‘My name is …’, ‘I have … people in my family’
    3. recounting personal experiences in sequence using basic detail
  3. Write a simple text that fulfils a function (VCEALC057)
    1. writing a simple description, recount or procedure after a shared class experience, for example a short text recounting making pancakes
    2. writing the names of items depicted in images
    3. copying and completing short, formulaic sentences to describe images, such as ‘This is a …’
    4. choosing a sentence from a class text to use as a caption for an image
  4. Illustrate a simple text (VCEALC058)
    1. illustrating a simple text to add detail, for example giving additional information about an experience, showing characters and settings in a story
    2. writing a caption or label for an image
    3. using drawings as a basis for oral explanations or captioning using simple writing
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Respond to the terms ‘writing’ and ‘drawing’ appropriately (VCEALA059)
    1. following instructions to write or draw, such as ‘Write your name’, ‘Draw a face’
    2. understanding that English writing consists of words formed by letters, and sentences comprising words
  2. Recognise the importance of accurate reproduction of letters and words (VCEALA060)
    1. forming both capital and lower-case letters consistently and legibly
    2. showing awareness that spelling is consistent, for example copying words carefully, asking how to spell a word, asking for a word to be written so it can be copied
  3. Choose a topic to write or draw about (VCEALA061)
    1. initiating writing or drawing about personal experience or classroom topics
    2. writing a simple response to a familiar text, for example using characters or a setting from a familiar story
  4. Contribute ideas, words or sentences to a class or group shared story (VCEALA062)
    1. listening to the contributions of others and adding new or different ideas
    2. making suggestions about the ideas to include in the text, for example the people and events to be included
    3. drawing on familiar vocabulary and sentence structures to suggest expressions for shared writing
  5. Reread own texts or sentences written by another (VCEALA063)
    1. reading aloud a text scribed by the teacher
    2. copying out a corrected version of own text, for example with corrected spelling or capital letters
  6. Handwrite, draw or choose materials with particular care when writing for special purposes (VCEALA064)
    1. writing legibly in different contexts and using different implements
    2. using a range of drawing and writing implements for different tasks, such as pens, pencils, crayons, rulers
    3. using ruled lines to guide writing on the page
    4. planning layout, for example placing headings at the top or leaving room for a drawing
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Use some conventions from home language when writing (VCEALA065)
    1. using some conventions from home language script, such as writing right to left or using letters or symbols from home language
    2. using invented spelling that may draw on home language sounds or on own pronunciation
  2. Clarify the meaning of a word in home language and ask for the word to be written so it can be copied (VCEALA066)
    1. talking to home language peers to explain the idea in home language and ask for a translation into English
    2. asking peers or the teacher to write the word in English after hearing the translation
  3. Use some home language words and words copied from various sources (VCEALA067)
    1. copying words from classroom resources such as labels, signs, word lists
    2. writing in home language script or transliterating the sound of a home language word in English letters when the English word is unknown
    3. asking home language peers or the teacher for the English translation and spelling of a home language word
    4. explaining the meaning of a home language word when asked, for example by pointing, drawing, using known language
  4. Understand some terminology of writing in English and/or home language (VCEALA068)
    1. understanding some terminology of writing, such as ‘word’, ‘letter’, ‘sentence’, ‘space’, ‘full stop’
    2. following simple instructions using writing terminology, for example ‘Write in capital letters’, ‘Leave a line in between’
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Use a very simple text structure repeatedly (VCEALL069)
    1. using the same expression in writing as in speech
    2. writing or dictating simple statements in time sequence, for example ‘I get my bag’, ‘I eat lunch’
    3. writing recounts or stories using repetitive time or sequence connectives
    4. copying the structure of classroom texts, for example using the same sentence stems or writing the details in the same order
  2. Show evidence of layout or planning in writing (VCEALL070)
    1. formatting pages consistently, for example writing the date and a heading, ruling a margin
    2. planning for a range of text features, for example placing text appropriately on a page, leaving space for drawing
  3. Label drawings of everyday personal activities using language learnt in the classroom (VCEALL071)
    1. using drawings as a basis for oral explanations or captioning using simple writing, such as ‘live here’, ‘play’, ‘study’
    2. writing the names of items depicted in images
    3. copying and completing short, formulaic sentences to describe images, such as ‘This is a …’
    4. choosing a sentence from a class text to use as a caption for an image
Grammatical patterns
  1. Write simple repetitive modelled sentences (VCEALL072)
    1. writing a small range of sentences copied from a model text, such as ‘I like …’, ‘I went to …’, ‘Today is …’
    2. writing repetitive sentence beginnings, for example ‘I … Then I … Then I …’
  2. Write sentences or phrases that reflect own oral structures (VCEALL073)
    1. writing simple strings of words that approximate sentences, such as ‘Go to school’, ‘Go home’, ‘Come from’
    2. using the most common coordinating conjunctions (‘and’, ‘but’) to connect clauses, sometimes writing run-on sentences, such as ‘At school teacher teach us and we work and we play’
    3. writing with some errors in word order, such as ‘I saw a car blue’
  3. Use some common noun–verb and adjective–noun combinations (VCEALL074)
    1. writing simple adjectives and verbs as single words or part of short phrases, for example ‘tall tree’, ‘He runs’
    2. using simple adjectives to express personal opinions or responses, such as ‘nice’, ‘little bit’
  4. Demonstrate some control of basic verb forms (VCEALL075)
    1. using a range of common action verbs (‘sit’, ‘eat’, ‘play’), sensing verbs (‘want’, ‘like’) and relating verbs (‘be’, ‘have’)
    2. controlling simple past tense for common verbs, including some regular verbs (such as ‘played’, ‘liked’) and some common irregular verbs (such as ‘went’, ‘was’, ‘saw’)
    3. using inconsistent use of tense within a sentence, for example ‘I went to the park and playing footy’
    4. expressing negatives in the most basic forms, for example ‘I no like’
Word knowledge
  1. Write some high-frequency words related to personal experience and school context (VCEALL076)
    1. writing some high-frequency words accurately from memory, including own name and short words used regularly such as ‘it’, ‘my’, ‘we’
    2. referring to classroom charts and personal vocabulary lists to check and confirm the spelling of high-frequency words
    3. recording high-frequency words in a personal vocabulary list
  2. Write new words with an initial letter or several letters (VCEALL077)
    1. representing words by their initial letter (such as ‘b’ for ‘book’) or by their beginning and ending sounds (such as ‘bk’ for ‘book’)
    2. writing strings of letters that approximate the pronunciation of words, such as ‘scol’ for ‘school’, ‘fes’ for ‘face’
Grapho-phonics
  1. Use appropriate letter size, spacing and letter formation (VCEALL078)
    1. producing capital letters, lower-case letters and numbers consistently and legibly
    2. writing repeated letters and numbers the same way, for example producing recognisable letters with some consistency when copying
    3. writing from left to right and leaving spaces between groups of letters or between words
  2. Experiment with some familiar punctuation (VCEALL079)
    1. using basic punctuation some of the time, such as full stops at the end of sentences, capital letters to begin sentences and for names
    2. writing capital and lower-case letters and full stops accurately when copying
    3. beginning to copy more complex punctuation accurately, such as commas, question marks, exclamation marks, quotation marks
  3. Spell with accuracy some consonant–vowel–consonant words and common words learnt in the classroom (VCEALL080)
    1. spelling some high-frequency words accurately from memory, including own name, short words used regularly, and consonant–vowel–consonant words such as ‘bag’, ‘top’, ‘get’
    2. referring to classroom charts and personal vocabulary lists to check and confirm the spelling of high-frequency words
    3. recording high-frequency words in a personal vocabulary list
  4. Use some conventions for printed English (VCEALL081)
    1. using conventional pencil grip when forming letters and numbers
    2. writing from left to right and top to bottom
    3. leaving a space between words
    4. using ruled lines to guide writing on the page
  5. Use basic keyboard skills to write personally significant words and simple modelled sentences (VCEALL082)
    1. locating letters, numbers and common symbols accurately on a keyboard
    2. using basic functions of a keyboard, for example using the shift key and space bar
    3. typing letters, numbers, symbols and words, copying from a print text
    4. typing familiar words, such as own name, without copying

Level A1 Achievement Standard

Speaking and Listening

At Level A1 students communicate in basic English in routine, familiar, social and classroom situations. They follow and give simple instructions, exchange basic personal information, and negotiate well-known, predictable activities and contexts. They begin to modify their responses and manner of interaction to match the responses of others and the context. They use simple learnt formulas and patterns, and they create original utterances by substituting words. Their utterances are characterised by a short simplified structure, simple subject–verb–object construction and overgeneralisation of rules. They use some basic communication and learning strategies to participate in and sustain interactions in English. They recognise that intonation carries meaning, and they listen for key words and for repetition of words and phrases. They use comprehensible pronunciation, stress and intonation. They use classroom resources such as picture cards or other visual texts to help them communicate.

Reading and Viewing

At Level A1 students read and engage with a wide range of short, simple, repetitive texts, including shared recounts and fictional and everyday texts. These...

Show more

Level A2

Level A2 Description

The Level A2 curriculum supports students to expand their repertoire of spoken and written English. Students explore communication in predictable social situations. Students learn to identify key points in familiar topics and to develop their capacity to use images as cues to decode meaning.

Students explore a wide range of familiar print and digital texts, including visual, multimodal...

Show more

Level A2 Content Descriptions

Speaking and Listening

Communication Elaborations
  1. Demonstrate active listening and follow speech (VCEALC083)
    1. displaying appropriate body language while listening, including body orientation, eye contact, facial expression, nodding or shaking head
    2. following visual stimuli that accompany speech or aural texts
  2. Respond appropriately in a range of common social and classroom situations (VCEALC084)
    1. responding with short extended responses including answering questions, adding to other speakers’ points, giving personal opinions
    2. expressing ideas, humour and simple opinions, and describing feelings, for example ‘I am very happy’
    3. giving a short presentation to a group on a familiar topic, such as sharing or recounting a personal experience
    4. borrowing key topic words and question structures to help formulate responses
  3. Negotiate familiar social and learning situations using language appropriate to the situation (VCEALC085)
    1. negotiating in a range of familiar situations, such as explaining a problem to a teacher, negotiating the rules of a game with a friend, participating in a class discussion, describing an object, ordering at the school canteen
    2. participating in classroom discussions about familiar topics or new topics that are well supported by visual material and/or scaffolding provided by the teacher
    3. negotiating activities with peers in small group tasks, such as suggesting, agreeing, disagreeing, clarifying
    4. participating in short, structured social interactions, such as exchanging basic information about family or school
    5. initiating and managing interaction through conversational formulas, such as ‘Sorry, you help me?’
    6. making simple requests and expressing needs, thoughts and opinions, such as ‘May I go to the toilet?’
  4. Predict meaning from context in simple interactions or spoken texts (VCEALC086)
    1. predicting the meaning of an unknown word in a conversation based on understanding of the topic and other words
    2. inferring the meaning of classroom instructions based on the actions of peers
    3. referring to images or other information to understand the meaning of a spoken text
  5. Understand key information in a short spoken or multimodal text (VCEALC087)
    1. identifying familiar words used in a spoken text, such as basic vocabulary, animal names, colours
    2. understanding common sentence structures that make connections between ideas, for example ‘I like pets and having fun’
    3. using questions to help identify relevant items of information, for example Student 1: ‘What colour was it?’ Student 2: ‘It was blue’
    4. pointing to parts of pictures that are mentioned in the text or conversation
    5. identifying key points of information from short spoken texts with reduced visual support
    6. understanding key information after viewing digital and multimodal texts, such as age-appropriate television shows or movies
    7. listening to a story and then retelling or sequencing the story using pictures
  6. Follow a short sequence of instructions related to classroom procedures or learning activities (VCEALC088)
    1. following a range of classroom instructions, for example book borrowing procedures, rules for using computers
    2. ordering information from a short spoken text using visual images
    3. identifying key words and phrases that refer to known objects in the classroom or locations in the school
    4. understanding common classroom action verbs such as ‘sit’, ‘collect’, ‘open’, ‘stop’
    5. using contextual information to clarify or confirm instructions, for example the teacher’s gestures, the actions of peers
  7. Participate in class performances of songs, poems and rhymes (VCEALC089)
    1. reciting rhymes, songs or parts of a familiar text, including some individual performance
    2. attending to pronunciation, intonation, volume and pace when rehearsing or performing role-plays
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Adjust speech to suit the audience and purpose (VCEALA090)
    1. understanding the nature of social interactions with familiar people and in known settings
    2. differentiating speech in a small range of situations, such as when giving a talk, speaking to a friend or adult, making an apology
    3. speaking appropriately for the situation by modifying voice, body language and expression to match other speakers
    4. asking about appropriate non-verbal behaviours in certain situations, for example ‘Should I give eye contact?’, ‘Is it OK to shake hands?’
  2. Initiate and maintain simple conversations with others (VCEALA091)
    1. understanding and responding to simple English expressions related to personal or familiar topics, for example answering simple questions by giving basic information about self
    2. borrowing words from questions asked, for example ‘What is your hobby?’, ‘My hobby is …’
    3. negotiating meaning through use of gestures, modified speech, simple questions and clarifications
    4. initiating exchanges in social and learning context, for example by asking a question
  3. Use a repertoire of common classroom formulas (VCEALA092)
    1. using common classroom formulas, such as ‘Just a minute’, ‘Give me a hand’, ‘Be quiet, please’, ‘Can I have a paintbrush, please?’
    2. using common social formulas, such as ‘Excuse me’, ‘Can you please …?’, ‘Yes, thank you’
    3. indicating agreement or non-agreement through formulaic speech such as ‘I agree’, ‘I don’t think so’
  4. Use a small range of strategies to negotiate meaning in conversation (VCEALA093)
    1. seeking help or clarification from other speakers, for example through home language, gesture, rewording
    2. interrupting to ask a speaker to repeat or speak slowly, such as by asking ‘Say again, please’
    3. using some social formulas when asking for clarification, such as ‘Please’, ‘Excuse me’
    4. composing simple requests to ask for clarification, for example ‘Please repeat’, ‘What means …?’
    5. referring to the speaker’s key words when asking for clarification, for example Teacher: ‘Get your stationery’, Student: ‘What is stationery?’
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Transfer knowledge of spoken discourse patterns from home language to English, with some issues of cultural appropriateness (VCEALA094)
    1. using home language discourse patterns, for example calling the teacher ‘Teacher’ rather than using their name or title
    2. using home language social practices in interactions, such as avoiding eye contact or not voicing opinion
  2. Use sentence patterns from home language to communicate ideas (VCEALA095)
    1. using home language sentence patterns or word order, for example ‘the house white’, ‘I very like swimming’
    2. formulating original utterances to communicate ideas and combining English vocabulary with home language sentence patterns
  3. Ask for translation of specific words from other home language speakers (VCEALA096)
    1. formulating questions in English and home language to clarify classroom instructions or new ideas and vocabulary
    2. drawing on a range of shared languages to negotiate meaning and clarify information
    3. understanding responses from peers that combine function words and topic words in home language and English
    4. recording translations of new words in personal vocabulary lists, including words and definitions in English and home language
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Identify a number of spoken text types and forms (VCEALL097)
    1. identifying a range of spoken texts, such as stories, poems, plays, recounts, descriptions, instructions
    2. using purpose, structure, content and language to help identify familiar spoken text types
  2. Use common time and sequence markers to link ideas in speech (VCEALL098)
    1. following instructions that include sequence markers, such as ‘first’, ‘next’, ‘and then’, ‘after that’
    2. understanding and using simple time markers such as ‘yesterday’, ‘later’, ‘now’
Grammatical patterns
  1. Recognise questions or statements through word order and vocabulary, as well as through intonation (VCEALL099)
    1. distinguishing between questions and statements based on intonation
    2. recognising common forms of statements, for example ‘I am …’, ‘This is …’
    3. recognising ‘Who’, ‘When’, ‘Where’, ‘How’ and ‘Why’ question forms
    4. recognising a range of different question openers, such as ‘Do you ...?’, ‘Can anybody …?’, ‘Is it …?’
  2. Combine known formulas, structures and other vocabulary to communicate (VCEALL100)
    1. creating original utterances by using new words with known sentence structures, for example ‘Yesterday I went to the swim’
    2. using a range of question beginnings, such as ‘Who’, ‘Where’, ‘How’, ‘Why’, ‘Do you …?’, ‘Can I …?’
  3. Construct a small range of sentence forms (VCEALL101)
    1. constructing positive and negative statements using subject plus verb, for example ‘I finished’, ‘The bus didn’t come’
    2. beginning questions with question words such as ‘Who’, ‘What’, ‘When’, ‘How’
    3. beginning commands with an imperative verb, for example ‘Come over here’, ‘Bring that’
    4. constructing subject–verb-–object sentences with accuracy
    5. giving some additional detail using short noun groups or adjectival phrases, such as ‘He gave me a new book’, ‘I ran really fast’
  4. Apply some grammatical rules but may overgeneralise for irregular forms (VCEALL102)
    1. expressing simple questions mostly accurately, including ‘wh–’ questions such as ‘Where did you live before?’ or yes/no questions such as ‘Is that my book?’
    2. expressing statements and commands mostly accurately, such as ‘She went home’, ‘Please give it to me’
    3. using correct verb and noun endings with some consistency, such as ‘–ing’, ‘–ed’, ‘–s’
    4. overgeneralising some rules, such as formation of plurals (for example ‘mouses’) and past tenses (for example ‘swimmed’, ‘buyed’)
    5. understanding some common phrases or clauses in both their full and contracted forms, such as ‘I’m’ and ‘I am’; ‘you’re’ and ‘you are’
  5. Use a small range of common verb forms accurately (VCEALL103)
    1. using some forms of the verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’ correctly, such as ‘Her name is Mia’
    2. using correct verb endings, such as ‘–ing’, ‘–ed’, with some consistency
    3. using a range of common verb tenses for familiar verbs, such as present simple tense (for example ‘walk’, ‘go’), present continuous tense (for example ‘is walking’, ‘is going’), regular and common irregular past tenses (for example ‘walked’, ‘went’)
    4. understanding basic expressions of modality when listening, such as ‘want to’, ‘have to’, ‘should’
    5. beginning to use basic modal verbs, such as ‘want to’, ‘have to’, ‘should’
  6. Express simple negation correctly (VCEALL104)
    1. expressing simple negation using common auxiliary verbs in full and contracted forms, such as ‘don’t’, ‘did not’, ‘can’t’
  7. Understand phrases describing place or location (VCEALL105)
    1. using common prepositions (such as ‘in’, ‘on’, ‘at’) to add simple detail about place, for example ‘go on the train’, ‘stay at home’
    2. understanding instructions incorporating place or location, such as ‘over here’, ‘next to the chair’
  8. Regularly use correct personal and possessive pronouns (VCEALL106)
    1. using a range of personal pronouns correctly, such as ‘I’, ‘me’, ‘he’, ‘him’, ‘she’, ‘it’
    2. using a range of possessive pronouns correctly, such as ‘his’, ‘her’, ‘its’, ‘our’, ‘their’, ‘my’
    3. using gendered pronouns with accuracy most of the time
Word knowledge
  1. Identify key words and ideas from short, familiar spoken texts supported by context (VCEALL107)
    1. recognising familiar and learnt vocabulary in short spoken texts
    2. understanding key information in short texts about a topic studied in class, and responding to questions, such as naming characters from a story, identifying an animal illustration based on a description
    3. using contextual information, including images, word lists or print texts, to identify key words and ideas
  2. Use words learnt from a range of classroom and social contexts (VCEALL108)
    1. using a range of words related to familiar topics, such as words related to family, school, colours, numbers, days, months
    2. using words from lexical sets related to topics of conversation, such as words for favourite foods or pastimes
    3. using words learnt from print texts, such as by asking what a word means, for example ‘I don’t understand. What’s “fete”?’
Phonology
  1. Repeat or modify a sentence or phrase, modelling rhythm, intonation and pronunciation on the speech of others (VCEALL109)
    1. imitating and rehearsing pronunciation, stress and intonation patterns used by the teacher and peers for a range of interactions and text types
    2. saying familiar sentences fluently, with phrasing modelled on other speakers
    3. modifying familiar sentences to incorporate personal details, for example ‘I like to play soccer’, ‘I like to play footy’
  2. Identify and produce phonemes in blends or clusters at the beginning and end of syllables (VCEALL110)
    1. identifying and repeating rhyming words using phoneme blends, for example ‘share’ and ‘chair’; ‘mind’ and ‘find’
    2. identifying words or syllables that contain the same phonemes, for example ‘bump’, ‘camp’
    3. blending two or three phonemes together to make syllables, for example ‘b-oo-k’, ‘sh-ee-t’
  3. Employ communicative strategies to enhance meaning (VCEALL111)
    1. developing accurate pronunciation and fluency based on modelling in a range of familiar interactions using personal language and classroom language
    2. using stress or intonation appropriately in common utterances, for example using rising intonation when asking questions, stressing key words in short utterances
    3. expressing emotions through intonation, for example surprise, frustration
    4. using body language, facial expression and gesture to enhance the meaning of speech, for example nodding, pointing

Reading and Viewing

Communication Elaborations
  1. Understand a small range of simple, familiar texts (VCEALC112)
    1. reading back own writing
    2. reading well-known words or phrases (such as ‘Tuesday’, ‘Once upon a time’) in new contexts
    3. recognising familiar vocabulary in new simple texts
    4. reading a range of topic-related texts, including informative, imaginative and persuasive texts, with support
  2. Understand information in texts read and viewed in class (VCEALC113)
    1. demonstrating understanding of simple factual or fictional texts by performing a task, such as following written instructions to plant a seed in a pot, dramatising or drawing parts of a story
    2. answering simple questions, indicating true/false statements or sequencing information from a text
    3. matching phrases and sentences from the text to images or diagrams showing the same ideas
    4. obtaining information from simple diagrams or graphs
    5. demonstrating understanding of new texts and responding to them, for example reading along with repetitive sections or predicting what comes next
  3. Use knowledge of context, text structure and language to understand literal and inferred meanings (VCEALC114)
    1. employing a range of reading cues, such as images, to help predict meaning
    2. suggesting what might happen next in a narrative with a familiar setting or characters
    3. describing the qualities or feelings of a character in simple terms that are based on images and print text
    4. making connections between the text and own experience or other texts
  4. Respond to texts in personal and creative ways (VCEALC115)
    1. responding creatively to a text, for example role-playing or drawing a picture
    2. talking about features of a story or poem that have personal appeal, such as fantasy elements, favourite characters, interesting words or phrases
    3. responding to texts through art, drama, movement and music
    4. talking about a favourite page to peers
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Understand how different types of images in texts contribute to meaning (VCEALA116)
    1. reading and viewing a range of factual and imaginative texts incorporating images, for example an illustrated story, report with diagrams, short documentary, infographic poster
    2. using images on book covers or within the text to predict content
    3. making connections between images and print text, for example matching a character’s name to an image, finding the name of a country on a map
  2. Understand that the purpose of a text is reflected in its form (VCEALA117)
    1. identifying texts as factual or fictional, and comparing features such as content, layout, images
    2. suggesting the purpose and audience of a range of common text types, such as picture book, supermarket catalogue, website, timetable
    3. answering simple questions about the text, such as ‘Would this text be more useful for a parent or a child?’
  3. Understand that texts can reflect a variety of ideas and perspectives (VCEALA118)
    1. recognising that texts may reflect a variety of cultural beliefs, practices and views
    2. suggesting an audience for a text, for example ‘This book was written for children’
    3. choosing narratives centred on a range of characters with different profiles and experiences
    4. giving a simple personal response to a text, for example ‘I enjoyed it’, ‘I learnt about …’
    5. comparing and contrasting ideas and experiences in texts with own experience
  4. Participate in simple group activities based on shared texts (VCEALA119)
    1. reading a text in chorus or reciting familiar poems or rhymes
    2. responding to the text, for example illustrating a section, answering questions about a text
    3. joining group discussions by listening to peers and giving brief, relevant responses to questions
  5. Select suitable books to read (VCEALA120)
    1. selecting books based on topics of interest or recommendations from others
    2. skimming part of a book to check for familiar English content, images, size, amount of print and layout, before making a selection
    3. comparing books with those previously read, in order to predict the suitability of topic, language, length and structure
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Locate words in a bilingual dictionary or in class word lists (VCEALA121)
    1. referring to a picture or bilingual dictionary to check spelling or meaning of English words
    2. locating words on classroom charts and word lists
    3. adding to word lists to keep a record of words, spelling, meaning and pronunciation in English and home language
  2. Relate something from a text to own experience (VCEALA122)
    1. identifying with characters in a story
    2. recounting a similar experience to that of the character, for example ‘That happened to me once, when …’
    3. describing similarities and differences in the setting of a narrative and own experience
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Identify and compare differences in text genres (VCEALL123)
    1. accessing a range of text types, including recount, report, procedure, narrative, poem, song, slideshow, web page, podcast
    2. identifying the topic and structure of a text based on its layout and visual appearance, for example use of headings or images
    3. answering questions about text purpose and organisation, for example ‘Which text tells us how to do something?’, ‘Which texts use headings?’
    4. matching labels to sections of a learnt text type
  2. Understand and use the basic features of different texts (VCEALL124)
    1. using language, layout or topic to identify the difference between factual and fictional texts
    2. using texts purposefully, for example following simple procedures, locating specific information in a known text, using a simple contents page or index
    3. following simple instructions to find information in a text, for example ‘Use the contents list to find the section about oceans’
    4. following simple instructions to find information in a multimodal or interactive digital text by following links and headings
    5. using images and headings to locate information about specific topics
  3. Understand and use a small range of metalanguage for elements of texts (VCEALL125)
    1. understanding terminology such as ‘author’, ‘title’, ‘letter’, ‘word’, ‘sentence’
    2. locating and labelling features of a text, such as author, heading, diagram, blurb
    3. identifying features of a text in answer to questions, for example ‘Who is the author of this book?’, ‘Where can we find the contents page?’
Grammatical patterns
  1. Focus on both content and functional words to understand the main idea in a text (VCEALL126)
    1. identifying the main idea in a text based on recognising repeated content words
    2. using function words (such as ‘the’, ‘and’, ‘as’, ‘in’, ‘of’) to understand the relationship between ideas in a text
  2. Use developing knowledge of English to predict some words or phrases (VCEALL127)
    1. finishing familiar phrases or sentences from known texts
    2. recognising the ways in which new and already known information is presented in sentences
    3. using knowledge of familiar words and phrases to make predictions about sentences and collocations, such as for collocations with ‘take’, for example ‘Don’t take the bus. It’s faster if you take the train’, ‘Why did you take so many photos?’
Word knowledge
  1. Read familiar phrases and sentences with fluency (VCEALL128)
    1. reading fluently frequently heard phrases, such as ‘and then’, ‘and he said’
    2. sequencing words or phrases in a familiar sentence
    3. reading sentences with fluency after rehearsal
  2. Recognise a small range of familiar words in different contexts (VCEALL129)
    1. using previous knowledge to read familiar words and phrases in unfamiliar texts, such as words from a high-frequency word list, and sentence starters such as ‘Once upon a time …’, ‘Today is …’
    2. recognising familiar words and collocations, such as ‘the big bad wolf’, in different contexts
    3. recognising some common prefixes and suffixes, such as ‘un–’ and ‘–er’, and how they change the meaning of words
Grapho-phonics
  1. Recognise all letters of the alphabet (VCEALL130)
    1. recognising all letters of the alphabet in both capitals and lower-case
    2. naming letters when spelling out new words
  2. Relate most letters of the alphabet to sounds (VCEALL131)
    1. using the common sound of each letter when reading a new word
    2. understanding that a letter can represent more than one sound
    3. pronouncing the sound of each letter when sounding out new words
    4. recognising beginning, middle or final sounds in words
  3. Use knowledge of letters and sounds to read a new word or locate key words (VCEALL132)
    1. matching a range of familiar spoken words with print words
    2. recognising some common syllables and patterns within words, such as ‘in’, ‘on’, ‘–ing’
    3. using initial letters and common letter patterns to decode new words, for example identifying rhyming words
    4. identifying familiar patterns within new words to support pronunciation
    5. suggesting, when asked, other words that might look or sound similar
  4. Recognise that full stops and question marks separate text (VCEALL133)
    1. using punctuation to identify whether a sentence is a statement or question
    2. pausing appropriately at full stops when reading
    3. using a rising intonation when reading a question
  5. Sub-vocalise when reading silently (VCEALL134)
    1. rehearsing the sounds of familiar words, and breaking new words into phonemes, while reading silently
  6. Read familiar texts with some fluency (VCEALL135)
    1. reading aloud with some accuracy and confidence words that are familiar or contain familiar letter patterns
    2. imitating teacher and peers to read short texts with accurate pronunciation, fluency, pauses and intonation
    3. repeating a sentence with corrected pronunciation, intonation or pausing when prompted

Writing

Communication Elaborations
  1. Write short, simple texts independently (VCEALC136)
    1. imitating the structure and style of familiar texts by using similar vocabulary, repetitive patterns, similar content or characters
    2. writing phrases and short sentences learnt from repetition, chorusing or a familiar class text
    3. completing cloze activities based on a class text experience
    4. writing simple phrases as captions or explanations for images
  2. Write beyond the immediate environment and beyond known language with support from the teacher (VCEALC137)
    1. following the structure of model texts, such as the use of a greeting, sequence of events and reflection in a diary
    2. altering phrases and sentences modelled in a class text to include personal and imaginative details
    3. recounting personal experiences in a blog or diary, based on reading similar texts in class
    4. writing imaginative texts adapted from or in response to classroom texts, for example following the same narrative structure, writing about a character in a new setting
  3. Write a small range of everyday texts and personal texts (VCEALC138)
    1. writing everyday texts and simple short stories, recounts and factual texts, based on own and shared class experiences
    2. writing for a ‘real task’, for example writing an invitation to a birthday party
    3. initiating writing for own particular purposes, such as to label drawings, make a birthday card, write a recount about a recent experience
    4. writing a simple story to share with the class that is based on listening to a story told at home
    5. writing simple factual texts to give information, to keep records or to inform, such as writing a shared class blog
  4. Illustrate texts purposefully (VCEALC139)
    1. connecting image to sections of a text, for example drawing the body of a frog, its habitat and its life cycle
    2. writing a descriptive caption or label for an image
    3. drawing images or diagrams to accompany sentences in a narrative or recount
    4. using an online storyboarding application to create a simple story map to show the events and characters in a narrative
Cultural and Plurilingual Awareness Elaborations
Cultural understandings
  1. Write simple sentences with minimal reliance on copying (VCEALA140)
    1. using common and familiar vocabulary from interactions or familiar classroom contexts and texts
    2. using spoken-like language structures based on familiar contexts and interactions, such as simple sentences about personal topics, long compound sentences listing a series of events
  2. Identify text type appropriate to the purpose (VCEALA141)
    1. being familiar with a small range of common text types, such as narrative, recount, report, procedure, description, explanation, response
    2. describing the purpose of a text, such as to inform, to describe an event, to tell a story
    3. copying parts of a text and filling gaps with personal details or topic information
    4. filling in sections of a template following instructions from the teacher or in collaboration with peers
    5. using learnt text structures or model texts to begin writing independently
    6. rewriting own text into a new format, for example by adding headings and images
  3. Contribute to shared writing activities (VCEALA142)
    1. listening to class discussions and adding relevant new ideas
    2. suggesting vocabulary to use in shared writing, based on vocabulary lists, learnt vocabulary and own reading
    3. making editing suggestions for a jointly constructed text
  4. Demonstrate understanding that handwritten texts usually need to be planned, edited and presented (VCEALA143)
    1. using graphic organisers to develop a simple plan for writing
    2. editing and re-drafting writing by using simple strategies
    3. reading own writing aloud to check meaning
    4. following feedback from teacher or peers to delete or add words to clarify meaning
    5. correcting spelling with reference to word lists or dictionaries
  5. Use a range of writing implements and writing styles for different purposes (VCEALA144)
    1. writing legibly and consistently by hand, using a range of implements such as pens, pencils
    2. using basic keyboard functions to create, edit and format texts
    3. planning the layout and format of texts, for example ruling margins, writing a first draft, measuring out boxes on a poster
Plurilingual strategies
  1. Model writing on other texts (VCEALA145)
    1. using words, phrases or sentence patterns from a teacher-modelled text, a favourite story or home language text
    2. constructing a short, basic text type, following the structure of a model text, for example copying sentence beginnings in the same order
  2. Use a range of resources to find words or phrases for own writing (VCEALA146)
    1. using a range of resources to find words or phrases or to check spelling, such as simple bilingual dictionaries, home language peers, vocabulary lists, classroom texts, spellchecker on a computer or digital device
    2. talking to home language peers to explain the word in home language and ask for a translation into English
    3. recording the word in home language and English in personal dictionary or vocabulary chart
    4. translating word for word from home language to English
    5. adapting the translation using English sentence structure
  3. Show interest in patterns of spelling (VCEALA147)
    1. asking how to write new words
    2. noticing similar spelling patterns, for example words that contain the same letter combinations, such as ‘find’ and ‘finger’; ‘air’ and ‘chair’
    3. comparing words in English with home language forms and meanings
  4. Understand a small range of terminology of writing (VCEALA148)
    1. understanding terminology such as ‘letter’, ‘word’, ‘sentence’, ‘comma’
    2. understanding a small range of more technical terminology in structured activities, such as underlining verbs in a short text
    3. following instructions for writing, for example ‘Fill in your name’, ‘Write each sentence on a new line’
Linguistic Structures and Features Elaborations
Text structure and organisation
  1. Use a variety of simple text structures (VCEALL149)
    1. relying on templates or model texts for organisational structure, for example using an introduction, body paragraphs and a conclusion
    2. copying topic sentences or parts of sentences to support idea generation and to structure writing
    3. reflecting the vocabulary and structure of spoken English in print texts
    4. using a variety of simple text structures, such as a title, an opening, an ending, a caption
    5. using basic conjunctions and connectives to show time and sequence, such as ‘On Saturday I … We went … We saw … I went ... Then I ... And then ...’
  2. Make a simple plan before writing (VCEALL150)
    1. writing simple headings to structure a text before writing
    2. following model texts or templates to arrange learnt text types
    3. separating ideas in texts by leaving a line or writing a heading
    4. locating images close to relevant written information
    5. using basic tools in a software application to format a digital text, for example formatting headings in a larger font, placing images near relevant text
Grammatical patterns
  1. Write sustained texts using sentences based on simple repetitive, modelled patterns (VCEALL151)
    1. writing original sentences with less reliance on copying
    2. writing repetitive patterns to produce longer texts, such as ‘I like ..., and I like ...’
    3. connecting clauses together to make compound sentences that may run on, for example ‘I came to school and met my friend and then we played handball and then the bell went’
    4. using ‘because’ to create dependent clauses, though these may be incomplete sentences, for example ‘We went to the pool. Because it was hot’
  2. Write sentences and phrases that reflect simple written-like structures (VCEALL152)
    1. using a wider range of sentence beginnings, for example foregrounding time or place rather than people
    2. writing a series of short statements in time sequence, for example ‘I eat breakfast. I go to school. I read a book’
    3. grouping together short sentences about the same topic, for example ‘Frogs are green. Frogs have big eyes. They eat insects’
    4. connecting clauses into basic compound or complex sentences using common conjunctions such as ‘and’, ‘but’, ‘and then’, ‘because’, ‘so’
    5. using simple pronoun references to avoid repeating the subject in consecutive sentences, for example ‘Archie came to school early. He felt very tired’, ‘Yesterday the class went … We went …’
  3. Write common nouns and adjectives in the correct order in formulaic structures (VCEALL153)
    1. building short noun phrases using adjectives, such as ‘the blue car’
    2. using simple comparative adjectives in basic sentences with varied accuracy, for example ‘My brother bigger than me’
  4. Use a small range of basic verb forms accurately (VCEALL154)
    1. using common simple past tense forms with the suffix ‘–ed’ consistently, though overgeneralising rules for some less common irregular past tense verbs, such as ‘catched’, ‘freezed’, ‘waked’
    2. using common irregular past tense verbs, such as ‘went’, ‘said’, ‘had’
    3. using a range of simple tenses with varying accuracy, such as ‘Yesterday teacher talking about cooking’, ‘I go to beach Saturday’
    4. maintaining simple past tense consistently across a short text such as a recount
    5. using more complex tenses inconsistently, for example ‘I have never eat it before’, ‘We caught the train then walk to the park’
    6. using some common imperatives appropriately, such as ‘Draw …’, ‘Stop’, ‘Mix the …’, ‘Cook the ...’
    7. expressing simple negative constructions accurately, for example ‘I do not like …’
Word knowledge
  1. Use high-frequency words encountered in classroom activities (VCEALL155)
    1. spelling accurately high-frequency words and words learnt in class, such as ‘the’, ‘and’, ‘is’, ‘it’
    2. referring to classroom charts and personal vocabulary lists to access topic words
    3. using sound or visual features to spell new words, for example ‘evry’
  2. Use some curriculum or content area vocabulary (VCEALL156)
    1. using learnt topic-specific vocabulary in simple modelled sentences
Grapho-phonics
  1. Write legibly (VCEALL157)
    1. using capital and lower-case letters appropriately
    2. writing from left to right and top to bottom
    3. writing legibly and consistently by hand, using a range of implements such as pens and pencils
    4. using ruled lines to guide writing on the page
  2. Use some punctuation consistently (VCEALL158)
    1. using a range of common punctuation, such as full stops, question marks, commas
    2. starting sentences with a capital letter and ending with a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark
    3. correcting capital letters and full stops when reviewing own or others’ writing
  3. Spell with accuracy familiar words and words with common letter patterns (VCEALL159)
    1. spelling high-frequency words correctly, including words with regular and irregular spelling components
    2. spelling one- and two-syllable words with common letter patterns
    3. using sound or visual features of words to attempt own spelling, such as ‘vae’ for ‘very’, ‘ar’ for ‘are’, ‘perpl’ for ‘purple’
  4. Adjust size of writing, colour, layout and choice of media to support meaning (VCEALL160)
    1. following model texts or templates to lay out learnt text types
    2. separating ideas in texts by leaving a line or writing a heading
    3. locating images close to relevant written information
    4. using a basic software application to format a digital text, for example headings in a larger font, images placed near relevant text
  5. Use keyboard skills to write short, simple texts (VCEALL161)
    1. using a keyboard to type capital and lower-case letters, numbers and basic punctuation marks
    2. typing letters, numbers, symbols and words, copying from a print text or composing a short original text
    3. using simple editing functions, such as inserting or deleting a word
    4. using basic formatting functions, such as making text bold or changing font

Level A2 Achievement Standard

Speaking and Listening

At Level A2 students communicate in an expanding range of predictable social and learning situations. They express ideas and identify key points of information in classroom discussions about familiar topics, and in new topics when they are well supported by visual material, an appropriate pace of delivery, and discussion that links their prior knowledge to the new context. They follow a short sequence of instructions related to classroom procedures and learning activities. They negotiate familiar social and learning situations, using English appropriate to the situation. They adjust their speech choices in response to audience and topic. They combine known conversational formulas and vocabulary, including some from texts read in class, and apply some grammatical rules to make original utterances of varying grammatical accuracy. They sustain communication by negotiating turn-taking and by using strategies such as asking a speaker to repeat or to speak slowly, or asking what a word means.

Reading and Viewing

At Level A2 students read and respond to a wide range of familiar texts. These texts may be print or digital texts, including visual, multimodal or interactive...

Show more
Scroll to the top of the page